Tuesday, June 28, 2005

Garita Series

Today: gallery of "la garita," the sentry box in Old San Juan. Enjoy the diversity of photos from a mix of photographers in the Puerto Rico Sun pool.

Me at El Morro07


Me at El Morro07
Originally uploaded by asawaa.

Old San Juan


Old San Juan
Originally uploaded by GinoPR.

prsun18
Originally uploaded by clarisel.

Fuerte San Cristobal


Fuerte San Cristobal
Originally uploaded by MsAnthea.

San Juan, Puerto Rico


San Juan, Puerto Rico
Originally uploaded by MsAnthea.

san juan, el morro, turret


san juan, el morro, turret
Originally uploaded by docman.

Another Look Out


Another Look Out
Originally uploaded by MsAnthea.

el morro


el morro
Originally uploaded by avigon.

Morro


Morro
Originally uploaded by crashxtreme.

Hacia la Garita


Hacia la Garita
Originally uploaded by jps_pr.

Saturday, June 25, 2005

Friday, June 24, 2005

St. John the Baptist


St. John the Baptist
Originally uploaded by clarisel.
From the pool

photo by Clarisel

Greetings to boricuas on the Feast of St. John the Baptist.

Check out this story on how boricuas celebrated the day: http://www.nytimes.com/2005/06/25/nyregion/25feast.html

Mr. T does NYC @ the Puerto Rican Day Parade

From the pool

Photo by Vidalia

Vidalia asks: "How hot is this picture?"

From A Boricua's Window


From A Boricua's Window
Originally uploaded by clarisel.
From the pool

Photo by Clarisel

Thursday, June 23, 2005

Wednesday, June 22, 2005

THE BROOKLYN RAIL - MUSIC Feature: "From Mambo to Salsa Part Two: Roots Sounds, Core Concerns" by Alan Lockwood. The Brooklyn Rail covers critical perspectives on arts, politics and culture
http://www.brooklynrail.org/music/june05/mambo2.html

San Juan Cemetery


San Juan Cemetery
Originally uploaded by RiffRaff.
From the pool

Photo by RiffRaff

"Odd to have a cemetery backing onto the ocean, but I would certainly rest in peace here," RiffRaff said.

So would I!

Monday, June 20, 2005

Sunday, June 19, 2005

Saturday, June 18, 2005

Friday, June 17, 2005

FYI

Please come to a screening of THE KRUTCH at the Harlemwood Film
Festival

THE KRUTCH
Written and directed by Judith Escalona
16mm/DV, 29 minutes

Monday, June 20, 7PM

The Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue
(between East 103rd and East 104th Streets)

"The Krutch" is a surreal narrative about a Puerto Rican psychoanalyst
with a long-suppressed identity problem that erupts with some dire
consequences.

The film is unique in exploring the mental anguish and shame associated
with racism. Stylistically akin to Buñuel with an eye towards Godard,
it occupies an absurdist space that keeps it from descending into the
maudlin cliches of realism. With Jaime Sanchez as the mysterious Dr. Guzman and Cathy Haase as his unsuspecting patient Mrs. Kleist.

I will also be participating in a panel of filmmakers that evening.


=======================================
Judith Escalona
Director

PRDREAM.COM
161 East 106th Street
(212)828-0401

http://www.prdream.com
Empowering community through technology
========================================

TOPIC: Hidden Facts in New Census Hispanic Data
WASHINGTON, June 13 /PRNewswire/ -- There has been much press coverage of the U.S. Census Bureau's news that Hispanics accounted for approximately half of the national population growth between July 1, 2003 and July 1, 2004. There are some lesser known but equally important facts that have yet to be highlighted in the new Census data. For example, did you know ...
Almost 4 million Hispanic U.S. citizens are not included in the Census national population estimates. Census estimates of the U.S. resident population "exclude residents of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico." While residents of the District of Columbia are included in national population residents, the 3.8 million Hispanic citizens living in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico are not counted. If these Americans were counted in the national population estimates, there would be 45.1 Hispanic residents of the U.S. rather than the 41.3 most recently reported by the Census. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Resident Population Estimates of the United States by Sex, Race, and Hispanic or Latino Origin, (Table NA-EST2002-ASRO) and Population Universe Methodology, U.S. Population Estimates by Age, Sex, Race and Hispanic Origin, June 9, 2005.
The proportion of growth due to immigration is the same for both non- Hispanic whites and Hispanics. The most recent Census data reported that more than half (56%) of the growth of the Hispanic population between July 1, 2003 and July 1, 2004 was due to natural increase (births minus deaths) and 44% to net international migration. This is the exact proportion of the components of population growth for non-Hispanic whites. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Components of Population Change by Race and Hispanic or Latino Origin for the United States: July 1, 2003 to July 1, 2004 (Table NC-EST2004-06), June 9, 2005.
The population of Hispanics age 65 and older grew by 25%. While the youthfulness of the Hispanic population has received attention, the growth of the older adult Hispanic population has not been widely reported. The new Census data show that while the population of Hispanics under 18 years of age grew by 14% since 2000, the growth has been 25% for Hispanics 65 years and over. This was reflected in an increase in the median age for Hispanics from 25.8 years to 26.9 years. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Estimates of the Population by Age and Sex of Hispanic or Latino Origin for the United States: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2004 (Table NC-EST2004-04-HISP), June 9, 2005.
The National Alliance for Hispanic Health is the nation's oldest and largest network of Hispanic health professionals. The nation's action forum for Hispanic health, Alliance members deliver services to over 12 million persons every year making a daily difference in the lives of Hispanic communities. For more information, visit the Alliance's website (http://www.hispanichealth.org/) or call 1-866-SU-FAMILIA (1-866-783-2645).

Source: National Alliance for Hispanic Health

CONTACT: Adolph Falcon of the National Alliance for Hispanic Health,
+1-202-797-4341

Web site: http://www.hispanichealth.org/

puertorico a todo cololll


puertorico a todo cololll
Originally uploaded by maraver.
photo by maraver

Thursday, June 16, 2005

Boat


Boat
Originally uploaded by crashxtreme.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by crashxtreme

Santa Isabel, P.R.

Wednesday, June 15, 2005

NY1: The Bronx: "Hispanics Dominate The Bronx, But New Immigrants Continue To Move In"
Click on "NY1: The Bronx" (above) and read story.
KEEPING SOCIAL SECURITY SOLVENT MUST BE NATION'S PRIORITY, NEW NCLR REPORT CONCLUDES

Expanding Coverage to Domestics and Other Itinerant Workers also Essential

Washington, DC - The National Council of La Raza (NCLR), the largest national Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organization in the U.S., released a report today urging Congress and the Bush Administration to strengthen the solvency and reach of the Social Security program for Latinos and consider options - such as add-on private retirement accounts, automatic 401(k)s, and making the saver's tax credit permanent and refundable - to further boost retirement security for this growing population. The Social Security Program and Reform: A Latino Perspective presents a comprehensive analysis of the Social Security program as it relates to Latino workers, taxpayers, and retirees.

"Maintaining solvency of the system is especially important for the Hispanic community," stated Janet Murguia, NCLR President and CEO. "Without Social Security, the poverty rate of eligible elderly Hispanics would more than triple, from 16% to 55%. Without the Social Security contributions made by Latino workers - which, according to a Census Bureau estimate, is $50 billion - the safety net we created to alleviate poverty would not be strong enough to support beneficiaries."

"As workers and as beneficiaries, Latinos have a profound stake in the debate over Social Security. It is critical to ensure that it is the social insurance program it was intended to be," continued Janet Murguia. "We need to make sure that all workers who pay into the system receive decent benefits when they retire. We must ensure that the Social Security program is fiscally sound so that young people today have guaranteed benefits years from now. And, we should do more, outside of Social Security, to encourage individual savings for retirement security for Latinos and all Americans."

NCLR's analysis found that the vast majority of Hispanic workers in the U.S. - 19.4 million Latinos - pay into the Social Security system. When compared with White and Black peers in many categories, Latinos are the least likely to receive Social Security benefits, for several reasons:
• Latinos who receive benefits tend to have shorter covered-earnings histories, lower average monthly earnings on record, and consequently, lower Social Security benefits than others with similar lifetime earnings.

• Many Hispanics are left out of the system because they work in informal sectors of the labor market or in occupations such as domestics and childcare workers, where Social Security rules may prevent them from earning quarterly credits that help them qualify for retirement benefits.

• Lax enforcement of earnings reporting in certain sectors, particularly for domestics and farm workers, prevents many Hispanic workers who have earned benefits from qualifying for social security.

"It is a must for us that the Social Security program include the hard-working domestics who help raise our children, farmworkers who put the food on our tables, and the health care workers who care for our sick and elderly. Despite paying their fair share into the system, they find themselves left out when it comes to retirement benefits," said Murguia.

NCLR's recommendations in the report include:
• Improving solvency through such measures as lifting the cap on wages subject to Social Security taxation from $90,000, considering expanding the revenue base with a capital gains and an estate tax surcharge, and considering modest changes to the normal retirement age if improvements to the disability insurance program can be instituted;

• Strengthening retirement security by creating add-on private accounts and enhancing savings vehicles such as 401(k) plans and private pensions, rather than carving out private accounts from the Social Security program; and

• Expanding eligibility for Social Security benefits by reducing the earnings threshold required for domestic and other itinerant workers, improving enforcement of earnings reporting, enhancing minimum benefits to levels above the poverty rate, and considering measures that would provide Social Security credit to those who stay home to care for children.

"We believe that everything should be on the table in this debate and we will focus on the substance and merits of all reform proposals," Murguia stated. "For example, our report found that add-on private accounts could help low-income workers build savings and assets over time without incurring the risks associated with a 'carveout' system. At NCLR, we will continue to analyze proposals, participate in the public discussion about Social Security, and educate the Latino community on these vital issues."

For more information or a copy of The Social Security Program and Reform: A Latino Perspective, please visit NCLR's website at www.nclr.org or call Luisa Grille-Chope at (202) 785-1670.

###

source: NCLR release

El Farol


El Farol
Originally uploaded by clarisel.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by Clarisel

FYI: Visitors have called this their "favorite" photo from my personal photostream at flickr (clarisel's photos).

Tuesday, June 14, 2005

i-Newswire.com - Press Release And News Distribution - STATEMENTS TO SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON DECOLONIZATION

Some of my favorites

Your favorite photos on Flickr

These are my favorite photos shot by other photobloggers at flickr. Some images are of Puerto Rico. Others are not. For some reason, these images are among my favorites. They touch me in some way. Just click on "Your favorite photos on Flickr" (above) to go see. Enjoy.

Clarisel

La Perla


La Perla
Originally uploaded by clarisel.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by clarisel

This is the photo on flickr that more visitors have viewed from my photostream. It is my most "viewed" photo.

Monday, June 13, 2005

sol means sun


sol means sun
Originally uploaded by lapamela.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by lapamela
Scattered violence mars relatively calm Puerto Rican Day Parade: South Florida Sun-SentinelRead the news story and make sure to check out the photo gallery of 21 photos of the parade and the police activity (unfortunately). Go to http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/nationworld/nyc-para0613,0,1861551.story?coll=sfla-newsnation-front

Wave to the camera


Wave to the camera
Originally uploaded by jorgeq.
Photo by jorqeq

From The National Puerto Rican Day Parade

Sunday, June 12, 2005

From the Headlines
NYC Sways to Salsa for Puerto Rican Day - Yahoo! NewsThousands of Puerto Ricans showed up to dance to the tunes of salsa and reggaethon for one of the city's largest cultural parades: The National Puerto Rican Day Parade. For more, http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20050612/ap_on_re_us/puerto_rican_parade

My Brownie


My Brownie
Originally uploaded by clarisel.
Brownie, my boricua dog.
From the Headlines

El Diario/LA PRENSA ��� OnLine��
Editorial: "Celebrating Puerto Rico in New York" -- Today's Puerto Rican Day Parade is a celebration of the traditions of the island and the contributions of boricuas on the mainland.

Playa Sucia


Playa Sucia
Originally uploaded by jps_pr.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by jps_pr

Cabo Rojo, P.R.

Saturday, June 11, 2005

Sunset in San Juan


Sunset in San Juan
Originally uploaded by GinoPR.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr group pool

Photo by GinoPR

Friday, June 10, 2005

FYI -- Headlines and Briefs

1010 WINS - New York's All News Station : Perth Amboy Allows Puerto Rico Festival
Low-Income Seasonal Workers Arriving in MaineIt is the time of year in Downeast Maine when thousands of seasonal workers begin arriving to rake blueberries, perform landscaping work, clean rooms and wash dishes. They come from all over, including places like Mexico and Central American, Eastern European countries and the Caribbean, to work.
But not all such workers are in Maine legally. While immigration officials are cracking down on illegal immigration, local contractors say they are not trying to harbor illegal workers and are struggling to fill an employment void and how to make sure worker credentials are good. To read more http://www.ellsworthamerican.com/archive/2005/06-09-05/ea_news2_06-09-05.html

IMG_1861


IMG_1861
Originally uploaded by Jaime Olmo.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by Jaime Olmo

Celebration of dance. How fun!

Wednesday, June 08, 2005

Orchid


Orchid
Originally uploaded by GinoPR.
Today's featured photo from the PRSun flickr pool

Photo by GinoPR

These beautiful orchids are owned by Edwin Rodriguez, a collector, Gino says.

Tuesday, June 07, 2005

piraguas


piraguas
Originally uploaded by lapamela.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool

Photo by lapamela

Today is a hot day in New York City. A perfect day for a piragua, a snowcone.

Monday, June 06, 2005

Remembering a "Patriotic Son"
Haverstraw -- A float decorated with the image of Manuel Lopez, a U.S. Army corporal who was killed in April in Iraq, led this town's Puerto Rican Day parade Sunday. Lopez, 20, was remembered as an American patriot who also had a lot of pride in his Puerto Rican heritage.
Village Mayor Francis "Bud" Wassmer said the new ballfield, which will be built on Warren Court, will be named in memory of Lopez. To read more, http://www.thejournalnews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050606/NEWS03/506060333/1017

Pond


Pond
Originally uploaded by GinoPR.
Today's featured photo "Pond" by GinoPR

Pond at Botanical Garden, Rio Piedras, P.R.

Wonderful reflection!

Photo part of the Puerto Rico Sun group pool at flickr

Sunday, June 05, 2005

IMG_1478


IMG_1478
Originally uploaded by Jaime Olmo.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr group pool

Photo by Jaime Olmo

Saturday, June 04, 2005

IN MEMORY

Rest in Peace

I am republishing a poem by Fernando A. Zapater, a friend, a poet and a supporter of the Puerto Rico Sun project. Thanks Fernando. RIP


THE ABSCONDED ROSE
By FERNANDO A. ZAPATER


THE ANGELS SENT ME THIS ROSE
BECAUSE THEY WANTED TO PLEASE ME
BUT A ROSE IS A ROSE IS A ROSE
WHEN IT HAS NO MEANING

BUT THE ANGELS SENT ME THIS ROSE
SO IT DOES HAVE A MEANING
THERE IS AN ANGEL SOMEWHERE
FLUTTERING HER WINGS LOVINGLY
AS SHE WATCHES OVER ME

I SENSE HER PRESENCE
FLUTTERING HER WINGS LOVINGLY
WATCHING HER ROSE BLOOMING
WHEN THE ROSE PETALS OPENED
I FELT THE BLOWING KISS

HER PERFUME SURROUNDED THE AREA
AND SUNSHINE CAME FORTH BRIGHT
THERE'S A SUDDEN BURST OF LIGHT
MY HEART JUMPED INTO IT
THEN I DISCOVERED MYSELF
IN THE HEART OF THE ROSE ABSCONDED.

c FERNANDO A. ZAPATER

El último de los Boricuas - Plaza del Mercado, Río Piedras, PR

Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr group pool

Photo by jenjenjen

jenjenjen wrote: "The small sign says "Que Dios te multiplique todo lo que tú me deseas" -May God multiply for you all that you wish for me."

Friday, June 03, 2005

A Simple Message: Leave the Flag Alone - New York Times

Respect the Puerto Rican Flag: Leave It Alone
Now that the big Puerto Rican Day Parade is right around the corner, some activists say not to desecrate the flag. Wave Puerto Rican flags! That's it.
The New York Times talks to Jaran Manzanet, a Bronx activist, about keeping the flag free of roosters, congas and Tito Trinidad icons.

San Juan, Puerto Rico


San Juan, Puerto Rico
Originally uploaded by MsAnthea.
Today's featured photo from the Puerto Rico Sun flickr group pool

photo by MsAnthea

Thursday, June 02, 2005

Mi esposa, Obra Maestra de la Creación de Dios.

Today's featured photo by Jps_pr
La foto de hoy por Jps_pr

Jps_pr escribio sobre la foto:
"Mi esposa, Obra Maestra de la Creación de Dios. No existe nada más perfecto ni más hermoso en toda la creación que mi esposa. Nada existe más bello ni más sublime que mi amada esposa..."

Who says men are not romantic?

Jps_pr wrote about his photo: "My wife, a master plan of God's creation. There isn't anything more perfect and beautiful than my wife. There isn't anything more beautiful or sublime than my loving wife..."

Photo is part of the Puerto Rico Sun flickr pool.

Wednesday, June 01, 2005

Revisiting La Casita


Revisiting La Casita
Originally uploaded by clarisel.
Photo by Clarisel

Boricua pride in NYC!
Culture and Identity

The Redefining of a National Identity and the National Puerto Rican Day Parade

By Manuel Hernandez
A twenty-two year old nephew and a 2004 graduate at the University of Puerto Rico, on a recent visit to the 2004 National Puerto Rican Day Parade to New York City, shared with me some interesting impressions of the Puerto Ricans there and made a few striking remarks about how his perception of a national identity had changed once he left the Parade and reflected on what he had seen and experienced while participating in the largest parade in the United States.

He was dazed at the sight of so many Puerto Rican flags being waved along Fifth Avenue and proudly displayed on tee-shirts, nails, hats, cheeks, heads and in other parts of the human body. In-spite of majoring in Puerto Rican history, it was hard for him to understand how and why Puerto Ricans in New York elected to celebrate and preserve culture without apprehension. He spoke about how excited, proud and happy they seemed after singing the one-hundredth version of "Que Bonita Bandera". I replied by giving Tomas a crash course on New York Puerto Ricans and how I felt the parade reflected a redefinition of a national identity.

Most New York Puerto Rican historians agree that Puerto Ricans have been migrating to New York as early as 1830. But in an interview for Carmen Dolores Hernandez' Puerto Rican Voices in English, a New York poet and historian, Louis Reyes Rivera, stems the migration in the late 1700's:"Puerto Ricans in New York are traceable to the American Revolution and even before, given that Puerto Rico was New England's single largest customer for smuggling Operations which were intended to avoid paying taxes (121)."

Commercial ties and the trading of raw materials paved the way for the early settlers. Towards the latter part of the 19th century, political circumstances proved to be the most important migration factor. Puerto Ricans who were against Spanish rule voluntarily left the Island or were exiled. After the United States obtained official political control of the Island in 1898, more working-class Puerto Ricans came to New York. By World War II, there were close to 150,000 people of Puerto Rican origin in New York.

Your grandparents migrated to New York in the late 1950's. They were part of a massive immigration movement fostered by the new Puerto Rican Commonwealth Government of 1952 and its political and economic links to the United States. "Los viejos" joined thousands of Puerto Ricans in their quest of the American Dream. The new immigrants founded a Puerto Rico of their own called "El Barrio". "The New York Island" stretched across 96th Street North to 127th Street and Fifth Avenue East in Manhattan. During the summers, "El Barrio" came alive with the sounds of "La Isla Del Encanto". Puerto Ricans brought their music, literature, arts, food and traditions to New York. As American citizens, they felt no need to deny their roots and culture. Spanish was kept alive at home. It was an inexpensive ticket back home, and many that came went back to "La Isla" or became extraordinary elements in the revolving door syndrome.

The first Puerto Rican Day Parade took place on Sunday, April 12, 1958 in "El Barrio". The Parade went National in 1995 to extend its borders and outreach. The Parade was established to create a national conscience and to appreciate the Puerto Rican culture and its contributions to the American society. It also stimulates the study, progress and development of the Puerto Rican culture and art. The National Puerto Rican Day Parade is a yearly event with on-going educational, cultural, social and artistic presentations throughout the year. Close to two million people attend the Parade making it the largest outdoor celebration event in the United States.

My nephew had listened for the past twenty-minutes, but he interrupted me and asked "Ok, that sounds interesting Tio but how is the Parade reflective of a Puerto Rican national identity?" I calmed him down and gave him my personal opinion. Puerto Ricans in New York are holding on to their culture.

For us US Ricans, the National Puerto Rican Day Parade is more than just a celebration of sorts. It is an expression of national identity. It's standing up for what we believe in. By reaffirming our Puerto Ricanness as a people, we define ourselves as a nation. Remember Tomas; it is only when you leave the Island that you begin to understand that you are a Puerto Rican. The political mayhem on the Island does not allow you to flavor or even sense a national identity. Just the mentioning of the term nation, frightens Island scholars and academics alike. The four-year three-party political enterprise in "La Isla" entertains itself with year long, endless and tireless futile debates on budgets, resolutions and foregone nominations. Flags are only pulled up after Tito Trinidad wins a fight or whenever a major Puerto Rican celebrity reaches a milestone or makes history. The red, blue and green politicians attend the National event in New York to make connections or to have an excuse to take a week off from work. Some Islanders will say that there is no need to honor the Puerto Rican flag, but Americans including the Puerto Ricans born and raised in New York honor the Stars and Stripes in every school, neighborhood and community in the United States.

Puerto Ricans in New York and other cities have a sense of nostalgia because those that left as children take with them the Puerto Rico of their childhood. Those that left as adolescents struggled to adjust to another identity and in the cultural warfare dreamed with the Island every day. The adults that migrated had every day visions with the green plantain fields and blue green beaches and dream of going back and buying a "finquita". They did not have to hide or bury their national identity.

The American way of life celebrates the reaffirmation of national identities precisely because the United States was founded and populated by immigrants. You my dear nephew have had a close encounter of the third kind with your national identity. Thousands of Puerto Ricans will experience the same identity encounter when they migrate to New York City or other major United States cities.

Manuel Hernandez is a contributing columnist to Puerto Rico Sun. He is author of a textbook titled, Latino/a Literature in The English Classroom (Editorial Plaza Mayor, 2003). He may be reached at mannyh32@puertoricans.com.

Sato Boricua!


Sato Boricua!
Originally uploaded by Irie Psilocybin.
Today's Featured Photo

Photo by Irie Psilocybin

Photo is part of the gallery in the Sato group pool at flickr.

http://flickr.com/groups/sato/pool/

This group is dedicated to images of "sato" dogs.